Home » Tag Archives: dogs (page 3)

Tag Archives: dogs

No more crying wolf

IN recent times, the dog-owning public have been bombarded with dog training entertainment programmes. Some, worryingly, have a “do not try this at home” warning. Pet dogs are being subject to all sorts of training and behaviour modification techniques borne out of wolf pack, dominance theory and now DIY TV programmes. Our domestic dog, canine lupis familiaris, is the most diverse species on earth and not a small wolf in the house. We have manipulated dogs both physically and behaviourally according to our needs, therefore up-to-date methods of training and problem solving looks to the breed’s need for reinforcing rewards. Many traditional trainers use dominance, rank reduction and pack theory techniques, based on flawed observations of captive wolves, canine lupis, in the 1940s. Typically, punitive/traditional trainers use confrontational techniques and equipment, delivering an unpleasant or painful consequence to a disagreeable behaviour, called positive punishment. Studies have shown that it is no longer acceptable or necessary to use such outdated and …

Read More »

Compulsory microchipping of dogs

The compulsory microchipping of dogs will be rolled out on a phased basis, beginning with pups in September and expanded to all dogs in March 2016. The announcement by Agriculture Minister Simon Coveney has been welcomed by the ISPCA as an indication of the Government’s clear commitment to animal welfare. ISPCA CEO, Dr Andrew Kelly said, “The introduction of compulsory microchipping is a major step forward for dog welfare in Ireland and is a key component of responsible dog ownership. The permanent identification of a dog will increase the likelihood of it being returned to its owner if it is lost or stolen. Compulsory microchipping will also reduce the burden on animal welfare organisations and dog rescue organisations caused by stray dogs and should result in fewer dogs entering the local authority dog shelters around the country. “Don’t wait until 2016, get your dog microchipped now”.

Read More »

Clare’s chances at Clonmel enhanced

WITH the county’s biggest number of qualifiers in recent years, Clare’s chances of taking one of the classics at the National Coursing Meeting in Clonmel on Saturday, Sunday and Monday next have been enhanced. With five interests in the Boylesports.com Derby, a total of nine in the Greyhound and Pet World Oaks and one in the Kevin Smith Champion Stakes, the Clare contingent will have plenty to shout about. However, the Oaks draw in Clonmel Park Hotel on Sunday night was not too kind to Clare owners, as five of them were drawn close to each other in the third quarter. Two of them, the Clarecastle qualifier, Miss Buttons, owned by Patrick (Jack) Moloney, Lissane and his grandson, Daragh and the Loughrea qualifier, Aveia, owned by the syndicate of Martin Keane, Kilmihil; Albert Long, Ballyea and Clifden and Dara Heenan, Limerick, go to slips together. Windfarm Ivy, trained by Pat Curtin and owned by him, Michael Eustace and Noel Hehir, …

Read More »

Poisonous plants for pets

While there are thousands of species of plants and flowers, only a small percentage of plants are truly dangerous and poisonous to your pet. Make sure you know which plants are most deadly to avoid your dog or cat from getting ill. Autumn Crocus: There are two crocus plants, one that blooms in the spring (crocus species) and the other in the autumn (colchicum autumnale). The spring plants are more common and are part of the Iridaceae family. These ingestions can cause general gastrointestinal upset, including vomiting and diarrhoea. They should not be mistaken for autumn crocus, part of the Liliaceae family, which contain colchicine. The autumn crocus is highly toxic and can cause severe vomiting, gastrointestinal bleeding, liver and kidney damage and respiratory failure. If you are not sure what plant it is, bring your pet to their vet immediately for care. Signs may be seen immediately but can be delayed for days. Azalea: In the same family as …

Read More »

And they call it puppy love

AN ENNIS woman with an incurable case of ‘puppy love’ is at the centre of an incredible tale of devotion and care for sick and abandoned dogs. Martina Flaherty, from Westbourne, loves all breeds of puppies and dogs and has saved more than 130 lives since she set up Babydog Rescue with her friend, Mags Mooney from Lisdoonvarna, earlier this year. Dog warden, Frankie Coote can’t praise Martina enough. “Martina’s work is essential because she has about 130 dogs taken from the pound since she started Babydog Rescue earlier this year. It’s a huge amount of dogs. She has a wonderful way of dealing with people and other rescue groups. “Martina and Mags Mooney fundraise and I think they have over 60 pups inoculated with the seven-in-one injections that have gone out to homes in Clare as well,” Frankie said. “There’s a lot of work goes into it and a lot of expenses before the dog goes out. They’ve fundraised …

Read More »

Fireworks can backfire on pets

MOST of us are too busy organising our own affairs to even consider Hallowe’en and the misery caused by fireworks. Each year, we are asked to keep our pets indoors or locked away safe and, each year, veterinary practices all over Ireland are full of dogs and cats that have become victims to fireworks, bonfires and their own terror. Pets are terrified of the noise and can be driven to extreme behaviour. Some will go off their food, hide for days under the bed or in other small spaces. Some will bite and growl at their well-meaning owners trying to comfort them; this can result of the poor dog being thrown out into a much more terrifying environment. Some dogs are so frightened that they run off to get away from the noise and get lost, many ending up in the dog pound or, worse, under a car. There is help at hand but, to give your dog the best …

Read More »

Sharon says ‘chip your dog’

September has been designated ‘National Chipping Month’ when dog owners can avail of free or reduced-price microchipping, as part of a nationwide campaign. Thousands of lost and stray dogs are destroyed in Irish pounds every year. But a simple microchip, no bigger than a grain of rice, can effect a successful reunification without delay and implantation is painless. “Alert to all dog lovers like myself: did you know that there are over 100,000 dogs out there with an incorrectly registered microchip? Were you to lose your pet it would be impossible to reunite you”, cautioned RTE news presenter, Sharon Ni Bheolain,who is backing the campaign. One in three dogs in Ireland is currently chipped but microchipping will be compulsory under the new Animal Health and Welfare Act by 2016. National Chipping Month is being promoted by veterinary practices, animal welfare organisations, re-homing centres, local authority pounds, pet retail outlets and charities around the country. Those with chipped pets are also …

Read More »

Complementary treatments for pets

We talk about ‘complementary’ rather than ‘alternative,’ treatments because each type has something that contributes to the whole treatment. Holistic veterinarians believe in what they do, despite a lack of scientific evidence that the tools of their trade – acupuncture, herbal medicines, homeopathy and other complementary therapies – prevent or cure illness in pets. A lot of people like the way their arthritic dog behaves after a round of acupuncture, or how a dog’s infection clears up completely with homeopathic treatment. But holistic veterinarians also understand the limits of such therapies and prefer to use them alongside more conventional ones. So what are the most commonly used therapies? Acupuncture is probably the most well-known complementary therapy. People have found both needle and laser acupuncture beneficial for thousands of years, so why not for our pets. Horses also benefit from treatments and as the equipment is mobile, treatments can be done in the stable or field. Acupuncture is one of the safest …

Read More »